Global Health News

Recent gains in eradicating hunger and poverty endangered by economic and food crises

UN Secretary-General calls on rich and poor countries to boost efforts and meet aid commitments

More than halfway to the 2015 deadline to achieve the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), major advances in the fight against poverty and hunger have begun to slow or even reverse as a result of the global economic and food crises, a progress report by the United Nations has found. The assessment, launched by UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon in Geneva, warns that, despite many successes, overall progress has been too slow for most of the targets to be met by 2015.

- Summer 2009


"Economic Literacy Community Economic Development (CED) Training – From Saskatoon to Mozambique" From the Quint Development Corporation Spring, 2009 newsletter Read article here >>

Making the Links Radio  - www.makingthelinksradio.ca -is pleased to collaborate with the Training for Health Renewal program in bringing  you this special 30 minute radio program on Global Health Watch 2.

Click Play icon to hear streaming broadcast or download mp3 (40mb)

The recently released Global Health Watch 2 is a must read to make the links on the state of the world's health.

We are broadcasting the voices of three prominent global health activists – Maija Kages, David Sanders and Jerry Speigel who will be bringing you their perspectives about Global Health Watch 2.

Global Health Watch  comes out of the largest ever civil society mobilizations in health – the first Peoples Health  Assembly which created the Peoples Health Charter which is a call to action on the root causes of ill-health and the lack of access to essential health care. The publication of a Global Health Watch took up the challenge for an alternative world health report.

This second Global Health Watch – following in the similar direction of the First Global Health Watch -  critiques both the state of global health and the inadequate global response to poor health and widening disparities.

It sets out an explicit political understanding of the current state of health around the world  - highlighting poverty as the biggest epidemic the global public health community faces,  and underlines the importance of economic policy as a health issue – and the impending and potentially cataclysmic effects of climate change on peoples health throughout the world.

It addresses other key underlying determinants of health – access to sanitation facilities, water and food, war and conflict,  the state of primary education, economic and social development of communities.

It emphasises not just the health needs of the poor and vulnerable people but also their relationship with the rich and powerful. Improving the situation of the worlds poor cannot be achieved through aid or charity alone . Profoundly unjust and unequal power relationships need to be tackled.

This and much more is discussed in Global Health Watch 2. You can obtain more information on Global Health Watch 2 at www.ghwatch.org or www.phmovement.org.